OBI OBI HALL

Next month’s Obi Surplus

Wednesday, 2nd of May 2018, 9.30 am to 11.30 am

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A gathering at the hall for a wedding

Photo by All the love in the world

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Last week’s wedding

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Obi Obi Creek spider bridge 1935

Photo from State Library of Queensland

The winding nature of Obi Obi Creek necessitated various crossing which hindered transport during the wet season. This difficulty was overcome in 1928-29 when three spider bridges were erected. Each consisted of two girders, squared with a 15 inch face and spaced at a distance apart to suit motor traffic. The absence of decking made them unsuitable for horse-drawn vehicles. These bridges were built about four feet above ordinary water level; this being regard as the most satisfactory height; the creek is subject to rises of 20 to 30 feet in a few hours during the wet season. This bridge height allowed the large amounts of debris coming down the creek during floods to pass well above the submerged bridges, and as the flood subsided quickly the bridges were soon open for traffic. Before their erection cream and produce had to be ferried on a wire and pulley during the rainy season. ( from  National Library of Australia – Nambour Chronicle, 16th October 1931 p7.)

Photo from sunshine Coast Council

 

A new sign erected at Obi Obi Creek Crossing number 4

Closed waters (regulated waters) prevent people from fishing in certain areas and these may be:

  • where a population of endangered or threatened species live
  • where fish congregate during or before spawning
  • where fish may mass or be stranded near artificial barriers and be susceptible to overfishing
  • to separate incompatible uses, for example spearfishing in a bathing area
  • to enable successful migration of fish through fishways.

No fish can be taken from Obi Obi Creek all year round between the Baroon Pocket Dam wall and the shortest line across the creek at the downstream side of Obi Obi Creek crossing 4 (Manuel Hornibrook Bridge). The use and possession of any fishing equipment in this section of Obi Obi Creek is not permitted.

Queensland Government, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

 

Hall fire circle

Timber supplied by Buster

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 Some of the hall’s regular inhabitants

Southern Orange-eyed Tree frog

Inside on top of the main door

Inside on top of the front door

Outside on top of the key safe at the main door

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Another wedding

 

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Last month’s Obi Surplus

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Origami demonstration

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OBI OBI HALL

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The monthly Obi Surplus is on again next Wednesday, the 4th, starting at 9.30 am

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A DATE CLAIMER

Wes Johnston, born at Frog Hollow in the Obi Obi Valley invites all valley residents to his 80th birthday to be held at Obi Obi Hall, 3.00 pm on the 19.08.2018

Details to follow

Jason and Piper Johnston’s property Cedar Grove surrounds the Obi Obi Hall

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One of the Johnston’s bulls

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17.03.2018

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 Room to move downstairs

The result of the under stage storage room clean-up

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A wedding on the 10.03.2018

 

HAVE YOU SEEN THIS TREE ?

Mexican bean tree

Native to tropical America

Recently discovered growing on the southern slopes of Buderim mountain

Queensland Government has declared Mexican Bean Tree as a category 2, 3, 4 and 5 restricted plant. If you have seen this plant, please contact Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23.

 

A fast growing tree to 40 meters high

Cecropia pachystachya, C. palmata and C. peltata

Photos from Brisbane City Council

https://weeds.brisbane.qld.gov.au/weeds/trumpet-tree

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Young Southern Orange-eyed Treefrog

Often found inside the hall, hunting for insects attracted by the emergency exit lights which stay on 24 hours a day. This one was removed to outside the hall to avoid the usual fate of death by desiccation

Litoria chloris

Adults grow up to 70 mm long

See Queensland Museum

http://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Find+out+about/Animals+of+Queensland/Frogs/Common+frogs/Southern+Orange-eyed+Treefrog#.WuLefohua70 

Photo by Frogs of Australia

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Maderia vine is flowering now

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The photos below show the cream flowering vine in trees at

Obi Obi Creek Crossing number Four

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Madeira vine is a Class 3 declared plant under Queensland legislation

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Madeira vine is considered one of Australia’s worst environmental weeds

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Eaten in Japan as a vegetable called Okawakame

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It’s a good time for silky oak seedlings which are coming up around mature silky oak trees

 

 

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OBI OBI HALL

 

Another Obi Surplus, this Wednesday, the 7th

At this Obi Surplus there will be a demonstration on brewing kombucha

 

An oddity – Green hoverfly larvae

Found in a plastic bucket full of water

The larvae of this hoverfly species, Austalis copiosa, are called rat-tailed maggots. The ‘tail’ is actually a tube that acts like a long snorkel which allows the maggot to breathe while living in stagnant water; the type of smelly water you sometimes find in drains and gutters. The tube is telescopic and can be many times the length of the maggot when fully extended.

Hover Fly on Lantana, Family Syrphidae

Taken from  Queensland Museum’s website

http://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Find+out+about/Ask+an+Expert/Question+of+the+month/Question+Archive/Questions/2017/June+2017#.WpkAYehua70 

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PLEASE NOTE: The origional hall front doors and most of the wood have found a home

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