OBI OBI HALL

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OBI SURPLUS ENJOYMENT

Next Wednesday 6th of June starting at 9.30 am until 12.00 pm

A talk on the use of essential oils will be presented

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Last weekend’s wedding

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Giant devil’s fig

A very prickly large shrub that is appearing more frequently in the valley

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Native to Mexico and central South America

An environmental weed suspected of poisoning livestock

Solanum chrysotrichum syn. Solanum hispidum

 

Hinterland Bush Links

A local group established to protect the plants and animals of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland

http://www.hinterlandbushlinks.org

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Some Obi Obi vehicles

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Information for visitors to our blog

The information below is from  Automattic,Inc the company who owns and hosts our WordPress blog

We also automatically collect some information about visitors to a Site. The information we automatically collect depends on which of our services the Site uses. We’ve listed examples below:

  • Technical Data from a Visitor’s Computer and Etcetera: We collect the information that web browsers, mobile devices, and servers typically make available about visitors to a Site, such as the IP address, browser type, unique device identifiers, language preference, referring site, the date and time of access, operating system, and mobile network information.
  • Visitor Interactions: We collect information about a visitor’s interactions with a Site, including the likes and ratings left by visitors to a Site using WordPress.com or Jetpack.
  • Location Information: We may determine the approximate location of a visitor’s device from the IP address. We collect and use this information to, for example, tally for our Users how many people visit their Sites from certain geographic regions. If you’d like, you can read more about our site stats feature for WordPress.com sites and Jetpack sites.
  • Akismet Commenter Information: We collect information about visitors who comment on Sites that use our Akismet anti-spam service. The information we collect depends on how the User sets up Akismet for the Site, but typically includes the commenter’s IP address, user agent, referrer, and Site URL (along with other information directly provided by the commenter such as their name, username, email address…oh, and the comment itself, of course).
  • Polldaddy Response Information: We collect information about visitors who respond to a Polldaddy survey. The information that we collect typically includes IP address, browser type, operating system, user agent, and the web page last visited.
  • Intense Debate Commenter Information: We collect information about visitors who comment on Sites that use our Intense Debate service. The information that we collect depends on how the User sets up Intense Debate for the Site, but typically includes the IP address and account information on the Site, along with the comment.
  • Information from Cookies and Other Technologies: A cookie is a string of information that a Site stores on a visitor’s computer, and that the visitor’s browser provides to the Site each time the visitor returns. Pixel tags (also called web beacons) are small blocks of code placed on Sites. Automattic uses cookies and other technologies like pixel tags to help identify and track visitors and Site usage, and to deliver targeted ads when ads are enabled for free WordPress.com sites or when ads are enabled on a Site through WordAds or Jetpack Ads (see the “Other Tools” section below for more details). For more information about our use of cookies and other technologies for tracking, including how visitors can control the use of cookies, please see our cookie policy.

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OBI OBI HALL

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The latest wedding

 

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Signage going up the range into Mapleton

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Signage just before Mapleton town

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Signage on Obi Obi Rd just out of Mapleton town

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Signage along Obi Obi Rd

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Signage before descending down Obi Obi Rd into Obi Obi Valley


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Stuck for five hours going down Obi Obi Rd

Photo by Sunshine Coast Daily

 

OBI SURPLUS ENJOYMENT

Organized by Melissa Van Kenyon

Obi Surplus Enjoyment is designed to create a space where we can share our surplus.

Everyone has things of value that they just don’t need.

Obi Obi could mean ‘plenty plenty’ and if we all bring something of value that we have too much of (eggs, oranges, clothes, plants or spare seedlings, books) then truly we shall all have plenty plenty!

The eventual aim is to remove money as the barrier to people who just wish to eat beautiful local food grown in healthy soils.

If everyone chose just one or two crops to grow, then we aren’t all going crazy trying to grow the huge variety of foods we all love. So if one person grows starfruit so well at her place and she loves to grow them… Bag of starfruit anyone? Yes please!

The last Obi Surplus Enjoyment saw people walking out with boxes of goodies and big smiles on their faces.

Bring what you have and you’ll be surprised what you get!!

9:30am – first Wednesday of every month at Obi Obi Hall

 Melissa Van Kenyon

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Last month’s Obi Surplus

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 A bucolic scene opposite the hall

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Victims of the hall’s emergency exit lights

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OBI OBI HALL

Next month’s Obi Surplus

Wednesday, 2nd of May 2018, 9.30 am to 11.30 am

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A gathering at the hall for a wedding

Photo by All the love in the world

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Last week’s wedding

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Obi Obi Creek spider bridge 1935

Photo from State Library of Queensland

The winding nature of Obi Obi Creek necessitated various crossing which hindered transport during the wet season. This difficulty was overcome in 1928-29 when three spider bridges were erected. Each consisted of two girders, squared with a 15 inch face and spaced at a distance apart to suit motor traffic. The absence of decking made them unsuitable for horse-drawn vehicles. These bridges were built about four feet above ordinary water level; this being regard as the most satisfactory height; the creek is subject to rises of 20 to 30 feet in a few hours during the wet season. This bridge height allowed the large amounts of debris coming down the creek during floods to pass well above the submerged bridges, and as the flood subsided quickly the bridges were soon open for traffic. Before their erection cream and produce had to be ferried on a wire and pulley during the rainy season. ( from  National Library of Australia – Nambour Chronicle, 16th October 1931 p7.)

Photo from sunshine Coast Council

 

A new sign erected at Obi Obi Creek Crossing number 4

Closed waters (regulated waters) prevent people from fishing in certain areas and these may be:

  • where a population of endangered or threatened species live
  • where fish congregate during or before spawning
  • where fish may mass or be stranded near artificial barriers and be susceptible to overfishing
  • to separate incompatible uses, for example spearfishing in a bathing area
  • to enable successful migration of fish through fishways.

No fish can be taken from Obi Obi Creek all year round between the Baroon Pocket Dam wall and the shortest line across the creek at the downstream side of Obi Obi Creek crossing 4 (Manuel Hornibrook Bridge). The use and possession of any fishing equipment in this section of Obi Obi Creek is not permitted.

Queensland Government, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

 

Hall fire circle

Timber supplied by Buster

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 Some of the hall’s regular inhabitants

Southern Orange-eyed Tree frog

Inside on top of the main door

Inside on top of the front door

Outside on top of the key safe at the main door

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Another wedding

 

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Last month’s Obi Surplus

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Origami demonstration

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