OBI OBI HALL

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The next Landscape Band tour of  Community Halls will be at Montville Hall on the 22nd of June

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The June Obi Surplus

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Weddings at Obi Obi Hall

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Indian myna birds have been recently seen at Obi Obi Hall

Two flocks were sighted, one flock of about 40 birds and a week later another flock of about 25 birds, both flocks were shy and quickly moved to cover when approached

Brown and black in colour on the ground but easily recognized by the white wing patch when in flight. The birds below are just taking off.

The Indian Myna is a medium-sized bird native to the Middle East, India and Asia that has been introduced to Australia and is now found in the Sunshine Coast region. As an introduced pest, they have the potential to become abundant, particularly in areas that have been disturbed by human activities.

Indian Mynas cause significant environmental problems including:

  • Removing native parrots from nest boxes or tree hollows and even killing eggs and chicks
  • Killing small mammals and removing sugar gliders from tree hollows
  • Spreading diseases that affect native birds (e.g. avian malaria)
  • Damaging fruit, vegetable and cereal crops
  • Spreading weeds
  • Forming large noisy communal roosts in suburban areas
  • Causing dermatitis, allergies and asthma in people

Above taken from Sunshine Council website

For more information on indian myna bird control see the link below

https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Environment/Pests-and-Weeds/Feral-Animals/Indian-Myna-Birds

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An oddity seen at Obi obi Hall one rainy day

A Shovel-headed Garden Worm

Scientific name: Bipalium kewense

Their feeding and diet is worth a read, use the link below

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/worms/shovel-headed-garden-worm/

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Birds in Backyards Winter Survey 2019

http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/content/article/Birds-Backyards-Winter-Survey-2019-rug-and-get-outdoors

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Australian Platypus Monitoring Network

People Assisting Platypus Conservation

Little or nothing is known about the status and stability of most platypus populations across the animal’s natural range from Queensland south to Tasmania.

APMN is an innovative Citizen Science approach to monitoring the platypus. Volunteers record platypus sightings at one or more sites using a standard visual survey method. This information is then analysed to see whether platypus activity is trending up or down or remaining steady over time. By tracking population trends, conservation action can be taken sooner rather than later to help ensure this remarkable animal’s survival.

For more information on platypus conservation see the link below

https://www.platypusnetwork.org.au/home

 

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OBI OBI HALL

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NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT, THE ELEVENTH OF MAY AT

KUREELPA AND DULONG HALL

The Landscape Band Tour is a collaboration between the Landscape Band and Hinterland Group Halls Management Committee members

 

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The Management Committee has made a grant application to Sunshine Coast Council

The application is to install a concrete drainage system between the hall’s stumps and water tanks.  Water collects after rain in the hall’s north west corner. Termites require water to exist, relish damp moist soil and could congregate in this area, leading to possible termite attack to the hall’s woodwork.

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Assistance with MRCCC rivercare/grazing project, Landholder Environment Grant and/or Land for Wildlife projects at Kenilworth information centre

You may be aware that a MRCCC staff member (usually me) has been available at the office space at the rear of the Kenilworth Information Centre one day a month. We are continuing this on the 4th Wednesday of each month as of tomorrow, Wednesday the 24th April. More good news is that one of the Council Conservation Officers will also be on hand. If you would like to come and discuss your MRCCC rivercare/grazing project, Landholder Environment Grant and/or Land for Wildlife projects (current and future possibilities) please make a time with either myself or Alan Wynn so that we can allocate some time for you. (alan.wynn@sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au)

Future dates are:- 22 May, 26 June, 24 July, 28 August, 25 September, 23 October, and the 27 November.

We look forward to sharing your community space and making the most of the opportunity to see you face-to-face sometime.

Eva Ford

Catchment Officer, Mary River Catchment Coordinating Committee (MRCCC)

 

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Recent weddings held at the hall

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The 2018 Obi Obi and Kidaman Creek Annual General Meeting was held on the 26th of March 2019 at Obi Obi Hall

At this well attended meeting, preceded by a sausage sizzle, the retiring Management Committee members were re-elected to their origional positions

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Just another Obi rainbow

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Regent Honeyeater & Swift Parrot Surveys

Regent Honeyeater and Swift Parrot survey weekends – May and August 2019

The biannual survey weekends for Regent Honeyeaters and Swift Parrots are happening again in 2019.  The dates for this year’s surveys are 18-19 May and the 3-4 August (and up to a week either side of these weekends).

 

 

See the link below for information and the survey

http://www.birdlife.org.au/projects/woodland-birds-for-biodiversity/latest-news-wl?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ABBC%202018%20-%20Email%205&utm_content=ABBC%202018%20-%20Email%205+CID_300827a0d7b18cf471252c305140b93c&utm_source=Email%20marketing%20software&utm_term=here

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OBI OBI HALL

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Obi Obi and Kidaman Creek District

Community Hall Association

would like to invite all member and other interested people

to attend our 2018 Annual General Meeting (AGM)

on the 26.03.2019 at Obi Obi Hall

Our AGM will be preceded by a barbeque starting at 7.00 pm

AGM meeting to start at 8.00pm

 

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Saturday, the 23rd of March

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The wedding of Erinn and Reece

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Last month’s Obi Surplus

By Richard Bruinsma

From Sunshine Valley Gazette Wednesday 13th March 2019

Next Obi Surplus 3rd of April 2019 starting 9.30am

 

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Obi Obi and Kidaman Creek District Community Hall Association has made a $500.00 donation to a Queensland drought relief assistance scheme ‘Rewired’ organized by Craiglea Stud in conjunction with Kenilworth Rural Supplies.

https://www.facebook.com/craiglea.racing/

 

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Ticks and mammalian meat allergy 

Some people develop an allergic reaction to meat between one and six months after being bitten by an Australian paralysis tick

https://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/4177191.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/02/25/3951271.htm

To remove a tick, freeze it, don’t squeeze it

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The hall’s frogs have a name

Dainty Tree Frog  – Litoria gracilenta

At full size they are about 45mm long

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/frogs/dainty-tree-frog/

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Leaf feeding beetles for the control of madeira vine  have been released at Obi Obi Creek number 2 crossing.

The release of Plectonycha correntina, a leaf feeding beetle for the biological control of Madeira vine.

Madeira vine, Anredera cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis (Basellaceae) is a South American perennial vine that forms dense mats over trees and shrubs. It is a major environmental weed of coastal and sub-coastal areas in Queensland and New South Wales and it poses a significant threat to biodiversity in riparian, sclerophyll and rainforest communities. The South American leaf-feeding beetle Plectonycha correntina Lacordaire was approved for release as a biological control agent in February 2011. The beetle was subsequently mass reared and introduced into madeira vine infestations in south-eastern Queensland from May 2011 onward. Both adults and larvae of this insect are leaf feeders, with larvae being particularly damaging. Post release field monitoring determined whether the beetle had established, the rate of spread from the initial release site and level of damage. Field observations at 29 sites where releases had been made before winter (6100 beetles in total) were made in October 2011. The insect had successfully overwintered at 51% of these sites, with adults, larvae and eggs being recorded. Post-winter releases of another 20 462 beetles over 72 sites in south-eastern Queensland, five in northern NSW, one in Central Queensland and two in Far North Queensland are also indicating promising results with insects being present and reproducing at 42% of sites in the following autumn. Damage levels at all sites were generally low, reflecting that this was the first year of releases, but 20% loss of leaf area was estimated at two sites. Preliminary analysis of data indicated that establishment does not appear to be closely related to the number of insects released, so other factors such as season of release, light levels or density of predators may be important.

Above taken from CABI

Invasive Species Compendium

https://www.cabi.org/ISC/

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 The results of beetles feeding on madeira vine leaves at number 2 crossing

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More information on madeira vine control at Kenilworth

https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Environment/Education-Resources-and-Events/Environment-Resources-and-Publications/Natural-Resource-Management-and-Conservation-Techniques/Drone-weed-mapping

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Madeira vine smothering a roadside garden

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