OBI OBI HALL

The Surplus is on again

The seventh of August

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The next Landscape Band tour of  Community Halls will be at Mooloolah Hall on the 10th of August

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Various hinterland community hall Management Committee members met recently at Mapleton Hall

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Obi Obi Rural Fire Brigade assisted property owners at a stack burn in the Obi

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The first well attended seasonal dinner

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The menu

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Recent weddings

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July’s Surplus

At this surplus a demonstration was given of damper cooking using camp ovens in the fire circle

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Testing the cooked dampers

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OBI OBI HALL

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Mary River Cod

Photo by Gympie Times

 

Proposed changes to the Fisheries Regulation 2008

Queensland Government is considering closing Obi Obi Creek to all line fishing from its Mary River junction upstream to Baroon Pocket dam.

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries is asking for submissions from interested parties, which can be made by completing an online survey or emailing/posting a written submission

This consultation process closes 5pm, Friday 19 July 2019

See the link below (get involved section) for the propose amendments to the Fisheries Regulation 2008, the online survey and the submission process.

Change 41 of the discussion paper details the Obi Obi Creek closure.

https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries

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A submission

TO FISHERIES MANAGERS AT D.A.F.

A submission by interested parties regarding the proposed closure of Obi obi Creek.

Re: the proposed closure (section 41 of plan) of Obi Obi Creek to all line fishing from its junction with the Mary River at Kenilworth, upstream to the wall of Baroon Pocket Dam to protect the breeding of the Mary River cod.

Our local community have fished here sustainably for over 100 years and recently some  have played part in the breeding and releasing of the iconic Mary River Cod, were pleased when this fish was given protection  and some went so far as to tell any visiting fisherman they saw that they were to immediately release any cod they caught

In later years only bass was targeted as they were not native to this stream, taking only legal length and only two per fisherman as per the regulations. Any cod caught as bycatch were photographed and released immediately.

Some years ago a section of Obi Creek was closed to fishing from the bridge at number 4 crossing to the wall at Baroon Pocket Dam but due to fisheries staff in the area being understaffed,  were  not able to properly police this area.  More signage would be of benefit to reduce the need for total closure.

If this proposal is enacted, the law abiding residents on and around  Obi Obi Creek will at the very least be most upset at this invasion of their rights to sustainably use this important part of our heritage. Not only riparian landholders on the creek but other residents of the valley as well as adjoining Kidaman Creek residents. For our community, fishing is part of the history of life in the valley, its learning and enjoyment has been passed from generation to generation and should be continued for future generations.

Our community can see the benefit of a breeding cycle closure; so why not apply a closed season from 1st August to 31st October to Obi creek in lieu of a total ban to fall in line with other streams? This would be workable if applied in conjunction with the now total ban from Crossing Number 4 to Lake Baroon wall and far easier to man than a total ban for the whole creek and cost wise would only involve a few more prominent signs.

We are aware that not all people who live in our community fish but we feel they should have the right to do so if they so desire.

Contact John Cutmore if you would like to be part of the submission above

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The Obi Surplus is again on this coming third of July.

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The seasonal dinner is getting closer, the 13th of July

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The 80th Anniversary of the Glass House Mountains Neighbourhood Centre

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OBI OBI HALL

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The next Landscape Band tour of  Community Halls will be at Montville Hall on the 22nd of June

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The June Obi Surplus

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Weddings at Obi Obi Hall

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Indian myna birds have been recently seen at Obi Obi Hall

Two flocks were sighted, one flock of about 40 birds and a week later another flock of about 25 birds, both flocks were shy and quickly moved to cover when approached

Brown and black in colour on the ground but easily recognized by the white wing patch when in flight. The birds below are just taking off.

The Indian Myna is a medium-sized bird native to the Middle East, India and Asia that has been introduced to Australia and is now found in the Sunshine Coast region. As an introduced pest, they have the potential to become abundant, particularly in areas that have been disturbed by human activities.

Indian Mynas cause significant environmental problems including:

  • Removing native parrots from nest boxes or tree hollows and even killing eggs and chicks
  • Killing small mammals and removing sugar gliders from tree hollows
  • Spreading diseases that affect native birds (e.g. avian malaria)
  • Damaging fruit, vegetable and cereal crops
  • Spreading weeds
  • Forming large noisy communal roosts in suburban areas
  • Causing dermatitis, allergies and asthma in people

Above taken from Sunshine Council website

For more information on indian myna bird control see the link below

https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Environment/Pests-and-Weeds/Feral-Animals/Indian-Myna-Birds

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An oddity seen at Obi obi Hall one rainy day

A Shovel-headed Garden Worm

Scientific name: Bipalium kewense

Their feeding and diet is worth a read, use the link below

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/worms/shovel-headed-garden-worm/

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Birds in Backyards Winter Survey 2019

http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/content/article/Birds-Backyards-Winter-Survey-2019-rug-and-get-outdoors

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Australian Platypus Monitoring Network

People Assisting Platypus Conservation

Little or nothing is known about the status and stability of most platypus populations across the animal’s natural range from Queensland south to Tasmania.

APMN is an innovative Citizen Science approach to monitoring the platypus. Volunteers record platypus sightings at one or more sites using a standard visual survey method. This information is then analysed to see whether platypus activity is trending up or down or remaining steady over time. By tracking population trends, conservation action can be taken sooner rather than later to help ensure this remarkable animal’s survival.

For more information on platypus conservation see the link below

https://www.platypusnetwork.org.au/home

 

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