OBI OBI HALL

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The next Landscape Band tour of  Community Halls will be at Montville Hall on the 22nd of June

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The June Obi Surplus

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Weddings at Obi Obi Hall

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Indian myna birds have been recently seen at Obi Obi Hall

Two flocks were sighted, one flock of about 40 birds and a week later another flock of about 25 birds, both flocks were shy and quickly moved to cover when approached

Brown and black in colour on the ground but easily recognized by the white wing patch when in flight. The birds below are just taking off.

The Indian Myna is a medium-sized bird native to the Middle East, India and Asia that has been introduced to Australia and is now found in the Sunshine Coast region. As an introduced pest, they have the potential to become abundant, particularly in areas that have been disturbed by human activities.

Indian Mynas cause significant environmental problems including:

  • Removing native parrots from nest boxes or tree hollows and even killing eggs and chicks
  • Killing small mammals and removing sugar gliders from tree hollows
  • Spreading diseases that affect native birds (e.g. avian malaria)
  • Damaging fruit, vegetable and cereal crops
  • Spreading weeds
  • Forming large noisy communal roosts in suburban areas
  • Causing dermatitis, allergies and asthma in people

Above taken from Sunshine Council website

For more information on indian myna bird control see the link below

https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Environment/Pests-and-Weeds/Feral-Animals/Indian-Myna-Birds

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An oddity seen at Obi obi Hall one rainy day

A Shovel-headed Garden Worm

Scientific name: Bipalium kewense

Their feeding and diet is worth a read, use the link below

https://australianmuseum.net.au/learn/animals/worms/shovel-headed-garden-worm/

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Birds in Backyards Winter Survey 2019

http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/content/article/Birds-Backyards-Winter-Survey-2019-rug-and-get-outdoors

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Australian Platypus Monitoring Network

People Assisting Platypus Conservation

Little or nothing is known about the status and stability of most platypus populations across the animal’s natural range from Queensland south to Tasmania.

APMN is an innovative Citizen Science approach to monitoring the platypus. Volunteers record platypus sightings at one or more sites using a standard visual survey method. This information is then analysed to see whether platypus activity is trending up or down or remaining steady over time. By tracking population trends, conservation action can be taken sooner rather than later to help ensure this remarkable animal’s survival.

For more information on platypus conservation see the link below

https://www.platypusnetwork.org.au/home

 

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